Jane Harrison Ofsted Registered Accredited Network Childminder

My Ofsted report 2011: 'Good Provider'

Description of the childminding

The childminder was registered in 1997. She lives with her two adult children in Staines, Surrey. The ground floor of the house is mainly used for childminding and there is a fully enclosed garden for outside play. The childminder is registered to care for a maximum of six children under eight years at any one time, of whom no more than three may be in the early years age group. She is currently minding three children in this age group. She also offers care to children aged over five years to 11 years. She is registered on the Early Years Register, and both the compulsory and voluntary parts of the Childcare Register. The childminder drives to local schools to take and collect children. She holds a level 3 childcare qualification.

The overall effectiveness of the early years provision

Overall the quality of the provision is good.

The childminder treats each child in her care as a unique individual, and works effectively with parents to ensure their needs are met. The childminder's good understanding of the learning requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage enables children to progress successfully towards the early learning goals. Overall, children learn about equality and diversity, and the society in which they live. The childminder is committed to the continuous development of her provision in order to improve outcomes for children.

What steps need to be taken to improve provision further?

To further improve the early years provision the registered person should:

enable children to talk to people and visit places in the community, such as the library and fire station, in order to learn about the local environment and develop a sense of community.

The effectiveness of leadership and management of the early years provision

The childminder has a high level of commitment to promoting children's safety. She has a good understanding of the potential signs of child abuse and has her local authority procedures to follow should she need to report concerns. Detailed policies, including a complaints procedure, are given to parents to make them aware of her responsibilities for safeguarding the children. All adults living in the

Inspection Report: 28/06/2011

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This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006

home have had the necessary checks to assess their suitability to be in the proximity of minded children. Highly detailed and effective risk assessments are carried out on all aspects of the childminder's home in order to identify and minimise potential hazards. Risk assessments are also conducted for each outing to further promote children's safety. Children learn to be safety conscious without being fearful. For example, they learn about the potential harmful effects of the sun and the importance of wearing a sun hat, and about looking both ways for traffic before crossing roads. The childminder is committed to building upon her existing good standards. She enjoys attending training courses as she recognises how continuous improvement benefits the children, as well as her personal development. Since the last inspection, the childminder has attained a National Vocational Qualification in childcare at level 3. The childminder has found self-evaluation of her practice a useful exercise to identify areas to enhance. One recent initiative is the way in which she now carries out planning. The childminder has improved her organisation by devising a plan for the week. This keeps her focused upon what she aims to provide for the children in order to promote their learning and development. Her plan for the future includes becoming part of a quality assurance scheme to maintain her knowledge of current good practice. Parent questionnaire forms enable parents to express their views as part of the self-evaluation process. The childminder welcomes their feedback. Effective partnerships with parents are well established and result in the individual needs of each child being met well. 'All about me' forms are completed by parents at the start of an arrangement to ensure all relevant information is exchanged, which enables the childminder to provide consistent individual care. Parents routinely take their child's progress file home to read. Consequently, they are well informed about their child's development and are able to support their learning at home. Parents also make contributions to the child's file by providing photographs of activities the child has done at home. This sharing of information enables a coherent approach to each child's learning to be established. Parents make very positive comments about the care provided, and describe how the childminder enables children to learn through activities indoors and outings. The childminder also liaises effectively with the schools and nurseries the children attend in order to promote their achievements and well-being. She ensures she is provided with information about each child's stage of development in all the areas of learning, as well as the themes and topics covered each term. The childminder's home provides a safe, clean and nurturing environment for children. A range of fun and stimulating resources is set out each day, based upon the interests of the children attending. Other play materials are stored in the 'sun room' in drawers or on shelves for children to choose. They have plenty of space in the living room to fully explore the toys. Children's comfort and safety is considered as the childminder has the appropriate numbers of travel cots and highchairs to meet all their needs. All the toys and equipment are clean and in good condition. Children learn about diversity in the wider society through socialising with others at pre-school groups, and through the resources they use in the childminder's home.

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This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006

Many books, puzzles, dressing-up outfits and play figures reflect positive images of different cultures and religions, thereby enabling children to learn about and have respect for people different from themselves. However, children have fewer opportunities to learn about people who work in the local community to help and support them, such as fire fighters and road crossing-patrol men and women, in order to develop a sense of belonging.

The quality and standards of the early years provision and outcomes for children

Children enjoy their play and become active learners as they make good use of the available resources. Each child's progress file contains detailed observations linked to the six areas of learning, along with an assessment of their development. The next step in their learning journey is clearly identified. The childminder uses suitable record forms effectively to monitor the progress each child makes towards the early learning goals. Children select books for pleasure and sit down in the comfortable book corner to look at them. They have opportunities to develop pre-writing skills through drawing and painting. This helps to promote language and literacy. They routinely count and match puzzle pieces, thereby fostering problem solving skills and numeracy. The childminder has a variety of children's laptops readily accessible to the children. These help them to develop the skills they will need to operate information and communication technology in the future. The childminder supports children's growing understanding of the importance of adopting healthy lifestyles. They plant strawberries and vegetables in the back garden and learn how to look after them successfully. They both enjoy and benefit from eating them. The back garden also provides a safe place to enjoy physical exercise through playing with a range of suitable equipment. The children also thoroughly enjoy walking in parks and on nature trails. The childminder helps children understand which foods are good for them by providing a range of healthy meals and snacks that take account of their individual dietary needs. Drinking water is readily available in their drinking cups to prevent dehydration, and children ask for them if they are unable to locate them. Personal hygiene skills are promoted as children become familiar with the routine of hand washing before meals. Young children are content and settled because their physical and dietary requirements are met. Children are relaxed and happy in the childminder's care. Their behaviour is good because they learn the rules of the house, such as not jumping indoors and being kind to each other. The childminder applies these rules consistently so that children develop confidence and good self-esteem because they know what is expected of them. The childminder treats each child with warmth and kindness. They demonstrate their closeness to her by welcoming her interaction with them, and willingly sitting on her lap for a cuddle.

Inspection Report: 28/06/2011

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This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006

Annex A: record of inspection judgements

The key inspection judgements and what they mean

Grade 1 is Outstanding: this aspect of the provision is of exceptionally high quality

Grade 2 is Good: this aspect of the provision is strong

Grade 3 is Satisfactory: this aspect of the provision is sound

Grade 4 is Inadequate: this aspect of the provision is not good enough

The overall effectiveness of the early years provision

How well does the setting meet the needs of the children in the Early Years Foundation Stage?

2

The capacity of the provision to maintain continuous improvement

2

The effectiveness of leadership and management of the early years provision

The effectiveness of leadership and management of the Early Years Foundation Stage

2

The effectiveness of leadership and management in embedding ambition and driving improvement

2

The effectiveness with which the setting deploys resources

2

The effectiveness with which the setting promotes equality and diversity

2

The effectiveness of safeguarding

2

The effectiveness of the setting’s self-evaluation, including the steps taken to promote improvement

2

The effectiveness of partnerships

2

The effectiveness of the setting’s engagement with parents and carers

2

The quality of the provision in the Early Years Foundation Stage

The quality of the provision in the Early Years Foundation Stage

2

Outcomes for children in the Early Years Foundation Stage

Outcomes for children in the Early Years Foundation Stage

2

The extent to which children achieve and enjoy their learning

2

The extent to which children feel safe

2

The extent to which children adopt healthy lifestyles

2

The extent to which children make a positive contribution

2

The extent to which children develop skills for the future

2

Any complaints about the inspection or report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance available from Ofsted’s website: www.ofsted.gov.uk

Inspection Report: 28/06/2011

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This inspection was carried out under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006

Annex B: the Childcare Register

The provider confirms that the requirements of the compulsory part of the Childcare Register are:

Met

The provider confirms that the requirements of the voluntary part of the Childcare Register are:

Met






My inspection report 2006 - 'Outstanding'

Inspection report for early years provision

Unique Reference Number: 116064

Inspection date: 07 November 2006

Inspector: Michelle Julie Gutcher

Type of inspection: Childcare

Type of care: Childminding

About this inspection

The purpose of this inspection is to assure government, parents and the public of the quality of childcare and, if applicable, of nursery education. The inspection was carried out under Part XA Children Act 1989 as introduced by the Care Standards Act 2000 and, where nursery education is provided, under Schedule 26 of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998.

This report details the main strengths and any areas for improvement identified during the inspection. The judgements included in the report are made in relation to the outcomes for children set out in the Children Act 2004; the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding; and, where nursery education is provided, the Curriculum guidance for the foundation stage.

The report includes information on any complaints about the childcare provision which Ofsted has received since the last inspection or registration or 1 April 2004 whichever is the later.

The key inspection judgements and what they mean

Outstanding:

this aspect of the provision is of exceptionally high quality

Good:

this aspect of the provision is strong

Satisfactory:

this aspect of the provision is sound

Inadequate:

this aspect of the provision is not good enough

For more information about early years inspections, please see the booklet Are you ready for your inspection? which is available from Ofsted's website: www.ofsted.gov.uk.

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are outstanding. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.

WHAT SORT OF SETTING IS IT?

The childminder registered in 1997. She lives with her family in a house in Staines. The whole of the childminder's house is used for childminding and there is a fully enclosed garden for outside play.

The childminder is registered to care for six children at any one time. Currently there are four children on roll. Local parks, shops and schools are within easy walking distance. The childminder attends the local parent/toddler groups. The family have a cat and a fish pond. The childminder is a member of the National Childminding Association.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROVISION

Helping children to be healthy

The provision is outstanding. Children are extremely well-protected from illness and infection, as the childminder maintains a scrupulously clean and healthy environment. She ensures that nappies are disposed of hygienically and that the changing mat and children's toys are thoroughly cleaned to prevent cross-infection.

The daily routine is carefully planned to ensure children have ample time to play in the fresh air and undertake regular exercise. Children play in the garden enabling them to run about and move around freely. Children regularly visit local activity centres, parks and toddler groups to enable them to climb and use a range of physical play resources. This enables children to undertake frequent and robust exercise to enhance their physical well-being. They develop balance and co-ordination as they play on the swings and climbing apparatus.

Babies and younger children have planned times for sleep and naps, to ensure they have plentiful rest to promote their healthy growth and development. Children have their own freshly-laundered bedding and use their own sponges and tooth brushes after meals to prevent cross-infection.

Children's dietary needs are extremely well catered for. They have frequent drinks and eat healthy snacks, such as fresh fruit. Children access drinking water freely, enabling older children to respond to their body's needs when they recognise they are thirsty. Mealtimes are regarded as extremely sociable occasions and children enjoy a healthy range of home-cooked, nutritious meals. Babies and younger children sit at the table with older children and adults, to enable them to develop good habits in using table manners and develop positive attitudes towards healthy eating. At snack time children enjoy sitting at the dining table cutting up their own bananas using child sized knives. This promotes the children's independence skills. The childminder has an excellent awareness of food hygiene as she has undertaken relevant training regarding the Environmental Health regulations.

Protecting children from harm or neglect and helping them stay safe

The provision is outstanding. Children benefit from an extremely well-designed, totally child-orientated environment in which they can be fully supervised at all times. Children's safety and security is given optimum priority. Children play in rooms which have been fully scrutinised for any potential dangers and a comprehensive risk assessment is undertaken to identify any hazards.

Children learn how to keep themselves safe as the childminder explains potential dangers to them. For example, young children learn they must not put long ropes around their necks whilst playing as they may hurt their necks. Toddlers clearly understand about being careful near babies and do not allow them to access toys with small pieces.

Children play with an extensive range of high quality toys and resources, all of which are checked regularly to ensure they are safe for children to use. Sleeping children are monitored closely to ensure their safety and welfare at all times.

Children are very well protected in the event of an emergency. The childminder practises emergency evacuation procedures with the children and has identified designated places of safety to ensure children's security and welfare. There are excellent systems in place for the safe arrival and departure of children. The premises are fully secure and children are unable to leave unsupervised. The childminder informs parents that children can only be collected by authorised personnel and a secure password system is in place to protect and safeguard children.

The childminder has a comprehensive knowledge of child protection issues and fully understands the procedures to follow if she is concerned about a child. This promotes and safeguards children’s welfare within the setting.

Helping children achieve well and enjoy what they do

The provision is outstanding. Children have extensive opportunities to participate in a stimulating, fun and diverse range of play opportunities. They undertake numerous outings to the seaside, farm, park, toddler group and soft play centre, which broaden their experiences and enable them to socialise with other children. The childminder provides an extremely fun, relaxed and vibrant atmosphere, enabling children to enjoy themselves, make new friends and feel settled and secure.

Children engage in many purposeful activities, enabling them to be highly stimulated and confident in the childminder's care. Children enjoy activities which are suitably planned to cater for their different developmental milestones. They enjoy challenges and develop confidence to try new things and gain new skills, as the childminder allows them to explore and experiment and develop interest and curiosity. Children use great concentration as they master threading the string through the tiny holes in the animal shaped boards. They enjoy pulling the end of the string out of the holes and eagerly look to put it back into another.

Children form very strong relationships with the childminder and enjoy close interaction. Young children successfully make their needs understood through gestures and sounds, which the childminder responds positively to, demonstrating a clear understanding of their differing needs. The children's learning is constantly extended by the childminder's skill of questioning and talking to them about the activities they are engaged in. Children enjoy close and loving relationships with the childminder. She engages in play with them and enjoys their company. Children sit at the dining table playing a picture card game of snap together. The children excitedly turn the cards over and attempt to name the pictures. The childminder claps and verbally praises each of them for their efforts and reinforces the correct name when the children are unsure.

The childminder has completed the Birth to three matters training. She demonstrates a full understanding of stimulating children's development and implements this in daily practice.

Children develop high levels of confidence and self-esteem. They feel listened to and clearly understand that their needs will be recognised. They feel valued as members of the childminder's family, enabling them to be extremely relaxed, happy and secure in the childminder's care.

Helping children make a positive contribution

The provision is outstanding. The childminder gives children regular opportunities to learn about the world they live in through outings and activities that introduce them to other cultures, for example by attending regular parent and toddler groups where children socialise with others from different backgrounds. Their appreciation of other cultures is enhanced by the variety of toys and puzzles that reflect diversity. They have opportunities to look at books that depict characters with disability. They play with boy dolls, Chinese and African dolls and enjoy dressing up in the multi racial outfits, for example Spanish and Indian clothes.

The childminder enables children to develop a sense of belonging whilst in her care, for example by responding to a child wanting a cuddle. She has developed a close and loving relationship with them and they look to her for support.

The childminder is skilled at supporting children and encourages them to take turns. She has developed strategies to deal with inappropriate behaviour, using distraction or talking to the child in a firmer tone of voice. Children are well behaved and play together harmoniously. They are beginning to develop a good understanding of what is right and wrong. The childminder sensitively explains when the children take toys away from one another that it makes their friends sad. Children are learning to understand the importance of sharing.

The childminder has developed superb relationships with parents who are kept informed of how their child is progressing both verbally and in the form of a daily diary. The childminder records observations noting the children's development and progress and uses these to produce an annual report for parents to keep.

Organisation

The organisation is outstanding. Children benefit from being cared for by a qualified and experienced person who is committed to attending childcare training and development courses. She has, and continues to undertake, appropriate training to enhance her existing meticulous practice and enthusiastic knowledge, thus enabling her to provide high quality childcare. The childminder is very clear about her role and responsibility in providing a high quality service to the children and their families. She has attended several Birth to three matters training workshops and has put in place an effective system to record and assess children's development.

All legally required documentation and records relating to the minded children are retained, ensuring that the childminder is able to care for children in a safe and confident manner. The childminder holds a current first aid qualification helping to ensure that incidents or accidents are dealt with in an efficient and prompt manner. Children's individual needs and requirements are well known and discussed with parents and carers prior to their child starting, ensuring their individual needs are well addressed and provided for. Children's safety and enjoyment is given a high priority as the childminder obtains parental consent for several aspects of her care. Extensive comprehensive written polices and procedures guide the childminder in her daily practice. This ensures children's needs are met and all relevant information is shared with parents. Parents actively take part in reviewing the paperwork and their views are respected by the childminder.

Observations relating to the children's minded day, development and general well-being are fed back to parents and carers informally as they collect their children at the end of their minded day. The childminder also completes a daily diary and observations for young children which she gives to parents. Children benefit from the excellent communication between the childminder, parents and carers.

The layout of the childminders home and outdoor area is very well organised for children to play safely, and they benefit from an environment where they receive excellent adult support to help them feel secure and confident.

The day is very well planned, allowing children time for quiet and active play. Information kept about children is relevant and helps promote their welfare.

The high quality of the provision means that the childminder meets the needs of the range of children who attend.

Improvements since the last inspection

At the previous inspection one recommendation was raised. This related to the required vehicle documentation. The recommendation has been addressed and the car insurance includes business cover.

Complaints since the last inspection

Since registration there have been no complaints made to Ofsted that required the provider or Ofsted to take any action in order to meet the National standards.

The provider is required to keep a record of complaints made by parents, which they can see on request. The complaints record may contain complaints other than those made to Ofsted.

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are outstanding. The registered person meets the National Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.